When Shyaira Dineen was in first grade, a teacher of hers told her to mark her race as African-Ameri… | Alena's Pins


When Shyaira Dineen was in first grade, a teacher of hers told her to mark her race as African-Ameri…

When Shyaira Dineen was in first grade, a teacher of hers told her to mark her race as African-American on a standardized test. Dineen remembers that day clearly because she says it confused her. She has a black mother and a white father. “I didn’t argue with her,” says the 23-year-old, but she did think it was weird. “Why do I feel like I only have to choose one? You know, if I chose two, would I get in trouble?” Dineen is now a student at the University of Delaware and says she often thinks about how people might react if she introduced herself as a white woman. “They would be like, ‘She’s crazy.’ ” Last year, after President Donald Trump’s administration withdrew guidance on transgender students, Democratic Gov. John Carney issued an executive order to develop a policy protecting minors from discrimination in Delaware. The administration proposed giving public school students the right to self-identify their race and gender without parental consent. But after facing a tidal wave of backlash, an unparalleled 11,000 comments from people in Delaware and around the country, and threats of legal action, the administration pulled back. Delaware education officials revised the plan. This time with language to include the need for parental consent and opened the proposal again for public comment. Illustration: Angela Hsieh/NPR

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